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Old March 2nd 09, 06:55   #651
Jade Jaguar
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Re: What are you watching now?

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Originally Posted by darth_librarian View Post
I also prefered McDowell in The Cat People when we was eyeing up his sister. Not sure what that says about me. That is one of my favoruite 70's horror / weird films.
Although Cat People isn't in the same class with A Clockwork Orange, I still think it is great, and vastly underrated. True, Natassia Kinski is hot, But I think Annette O'Toole is WAY hotter. But, I have a thing for red hair...
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Old March 3rd 09, 09:58   #652
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Re: What are you watching now?

The films are obviously leagues apart artistically and influentailly. i just liked the Cat People for its overt weirdness. Did not realise it was made in 1982 though.
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Old March 3rd 09, 20:32   #653
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Re: What are you watching now?

I watched Olver's Stone 'W' recently.

I was really expecting to enjoy it. Of course w/ Stone I was expecting something kooky, wild exaggerations, simplistic character studies, delivered with high stylization and oodles of camp. Then I heard that he took a somewhat sympathetic perspective towards Bush as a person and figured well that might be fun, too.

Instead, what I saw was a pointless, easy collection of famous Bush quotes and moments presented in out-of-context collage form and a bunch of impersonations of various effectiveness. It was basically if you take our charicatures of these people and film them, you have this movie, and it wasn't done with enough style to make it interesting.
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Old March 4th 09, 08:27   #654
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Re: What are you watching now?

Infamous (2006)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0420609/

The other Capote movie, (the other one being Capote) that never got as much coverage. This one felt more like a traditional movie, the other felt more like acted out reportage. I also thought Toby Jones's performance was better than Hoffman's, although his was more extrovert and possibly more of a charicature. Was more sympathetic to Capote and the two killers, with great turn from Daniel Craig as Perry. Sandra Bullock was rather good as Harper Lee. She is quite underrated, and I still have a thing for her.

My other half is a massive Capote nut, and has read In Cold Blood about 20 times, not to mention numberous essays.
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- Kurt Vonnegut

"There's no point debating anything online. It provides scant room for debate and infinite opportunities for fruitless point-scoring: the heady combination of perceived anonymity, gestated responses, random heckling and a notional "live audience" quickly conspire to create a "perfect storm" of perpetual bickering."
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Old March 4th 09, 16:19   #655
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Re: What are you watching now?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jade Jaguar View Post
Although Cat People isn't in the same class with A Clockwork Orange, I still think it is great, and vastly underrated. True, Natassia Kinski is hot, But I think Annette O'Toole is WAY hotter. But, I have a thing for red hair...
She is hot. When I started watching Smallville, I went "Doh! It's Annette O'Toole. Yesssss." Then I realized she was married to Bo Duke. In the end, that was ok too because he actually was pretty good in that role.
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Old March 5th 09, 16:17   #656
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Re: What are you watching now?

As usual full reviews can be found at,

Bill's Movie Emporium
http://billsmovieemporium.wordpress.com/

Fanny Och Alexander (1982)
To start, the only real problem I had with Fanny Och Alexander was that it is obvious that it has been edited down from the TV mini-series, because there are moments and scenes that are clearly missing. Outside of that, a great Bergman picture. I'm not willing to call it his best, because i don't think much separates his top work. This is much more accessible than his earlier work, and while it still meditates on life and involves the supernatural, it also has a much more conventional narrative. The final theatrical film of a great director.

True Romance (Director's Cut) (1993)
It's no secret that I am not a Tarantino fan , and like most I find Scott passable at best. For those reasons I was surprised to love True Romance as much as I did. It's a fun fantasy tale, with great dialogue and over the top nature that works and a really nice cast. The blood flows, Gary Oldman tries to steal the show, just an overall great, energetic experience.

Dark City (Director's Cut) (1998)
I'm a huge sci-fi fan, but I generally find the dystopia based stories hit or miss. Dark City is definitely in the hit category, as I found every facet of this film pretty great and a far superior version of many of its followers. A tremendous look, I liked the effects, Sewell and Connelly were great like usual, and a film that made you think, even after the supposedly happy ending.

Hôhokekyo Tonari No Yamada-kun (1999)
Tremendous fun, but not in a slapstick sort of way, although there is a lot of slapstick humor. This was a heartfelt and cheerful film, that had its tender moments but always kept an air of sweetness and comedy about it. Isao Takahata is a great filmmaker, and this is but another entry in his diverse collection of films.

Jigokumon (1953)
Some really bad acting in this one, especially from Machiko Kyo who is usually stellar. All the battle scenes were far too chaotic and you never had any idea what was going on or who was who. The story itself was okay, but not all that deep and pretty standard stuff.

Rebecca (1940)
All the typical Hitchcock flair is present, although he is more reserved with his camera work. But, Hitchcock left two important things behind, emotion and humor. Because of the omission of any humor and emotion Rebecca ends up feeling more mechanical than anything else. I could tell a fine movie was being made, but it never gave me any reason to acre, if I'm making any sense.

My Left Foot: The True Story Of Christy Brown (1989)
For the most part this avoids the typical biopic pitfalls, although it does veer towards forced sentimentality on a few occasions. But, it remains a great movie because of the great performances of the cast as a whole, the much known stellar job by Daniel Day-Lewis and the never given enough credit portrayal of young Christy by Hugh O'Conor.

Anatomy Of A Murder (1959)
It's Jimmy Stewart letting loose in court, opposed by George C. Scott, that's more than enough right there. But, outside of a few lulls in the story, Anatomy is the best deconstruction of what the judicial system is all about ever put to screen. It's why lawyers need their egos and why star power in the court room matters more than the truth, brilliant material.

La Battaglia Di Algei (1966)
When watching this I was initially impressed with what was being shown to me. The raw, documentary style is always impressive and Battaglia ends up a finely crafted film, but it took a stance and ended up being too uneven in its want to support that stance. The actions of the French are always played so as too be terrible atrocious acts, but when the FLN commit atrocities of their own they are played silently and with no emotion in an attempt to get us not to associate the FLN with the deaths and to rally in their cause against the French. This started off great, but it ended up very uneven.

Hook (1991)
There is so much that is wrong with this film, yet I still had a lot of fun with it. That's really all it comes down to with me, despite its many flaws I had a lot of fun and enjoyed it more than enough to make up for its many faults.

Dracula (1992)
So yeah, Coppola is big on romance, and illicit sex and lush scenery and whimsical ideas. Not so much on the story, or actually giving me a Dracula I want to see or a John Harkens that doesn't sound like a surfer dude with a German accent in his attempt to sound British. I liked a lot of this film, but I have a feeling that was more due to my general "I heart you" feelings towards the entire Dracula mythos. Hey, it's Tom Waits, he's just as insane as I thought he would be, and oh my, Ms. Bellucci you can turn me into a vampire any day of the week!

Burakku Jakku (1996)
I liked the idea of the medical mystery, but it slowly loses steam as the movie devolves into a bland action film with cheesiness and shoot outs galore. I also wasn't a huge fan of the still style animation and the character of Black Jack was way too underdeveloped. Still, I did enjoy the first thirty or so minutes.
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Old March 10th 09, 14:27   #657
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Re: What are you watching now?

As usual, full reviews can be found at,

Bill's Movie Emporium
http://billsmovieemporium.wordpress.com/

Jumanji (1995)
This movie was a lot of fun, that's what it came down to for me. I enjoyed where they went with the story, the fact that it was really out there didn't bother me at all, i enjoyed the action, the humor and had a good time watching it.

Boogie Nights (1997)
My favorite PT Anderson and the best of his works that I have seen, I have yet to see Punch-Drunk Love. The only problem I had in the film was Hollywood's inability to film fellatio scenes that don't come across as comical, but other than that it was crafted tremendously well. I've always felt Anderson's greatest achievement was convincing the rest of Hollywood that Marky Mark could actually act.

Sophie Scholl - Die Letzten Tage (2005)
A bit too on the nose, and it loses itself when it decides to go for heavy dramatics near the end. But, I thought the initial interrogation scenes were gripping and well done while the laid back matter of fact non-drama style employed for the majority of the film worked for me.

The Graduate (1967)
I will never get the love for this film. It wasn't funny, it didn't speak to me, nor did it speak to any child of the 60's who I have known through the years. This rang really false to me, with underdeveloped and dead to life characters everywhere, and the only character who actually wants to experience life is punished for it. Not a good film, yet somehow people still keep on loving it.

Pinocchio (1940)
As much as I did like Pinocchio, it never felt like a whole movie to me. Compared to say, Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs, this was a lesser picture for its inability to come together as one cohesive film. Still, it has individual set pieces that are as great as anything you'll find on other animated adventures. So, despite the fractured nature of the story I still liked this a lot.

Gone With The Wind (1939)
Like most epics, this has moments where it works and moments where it doesn't. Of course the obvious rug sweeping of the racial issues is a knock against it, as is the final hour of the film where it drags on and becomes a completely different film than the first three hours. Still, it looked gorgeous, has tremendous set design and cinematography and was engaging for the first couple of hours.

Les Quatre Cents Coups (1959)
I was underwhelmed by my experience with Jules Et Jim, so when finally delving back into the work of François Truffaut I gave this one a go. Smart decision on my part, because the only word I can think of to describe Les Quatre Cents Coups is breathtaking. It's raw and real, but it's never heavy handed or on the nose. It makes you believe in the disenfranchisement of Antoine and the French youth around this period, and it has moments of true joy. The ending may be the bets part, because it perfectly leaves everything in your own hands, what happens to Antoine next is up to you. Of course the character would return again, but that doesn't affect the singular experience of this film.

Chinatown (1974)
I loved the way this played with noir conventions, such as the character of Jake who is just like every noir detective, but not like them at all, if that makes any sense. The dialogue was different, because a lot of what would have been implied in the 40's was shown on screen, so now it had to be slick in other areas and make other implications. My only real reserve is that at times I thought it was bathed in too much light, as that was the one subversion of the genre that I didn't fully get behind.

Doctor Zhivago (1965)
This looks pretty, with amazing visuals, the ice house is one of the best set designs I have ever seen. Outside of that it's a whole lot of fluff and nonsense, but it sure does look amazing.

American Beauty (1999)
I really do love this film. I know a lot of people for some reason have turned on it over the years, but I'm the opposite, as time has gone by I like it more and more. Kevin Spacey is amazing, Annette Benning acts again, Chris Cooper is his usual great self and I loved the mixture of storytelling styles. I had no problems at all with this film, especially since I didn't find it heavy handed or cliche like most.

Rocky (1976)
An inspirational tale, and a well constructed tale at that. I had serious problems with the boxing scenes, morseo the training ones than the fights themselves, because of how unrealistic they were. But, that was really my only major problem with the film, otherwise I felt this worked fine as the inspirational sports tale that would become the standard for almost every sports movie to come.
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Old March 10th 09, 16:14   #658
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Re: What are you watching now?

I've always been an American Beauty fan. I'll never forget the first time I saw it in the theater. My heart was pounding by the end. It was relentless and perfect (insofar as a movie, imho.)
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Old March 10th 09, 23:28   #659
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Re: What are you watching now?

Cell, glad you liked The 400 Blows, it is one of my favorites. It blew me away the first time I saw it. I think I was 20 then.

I think you are spot on about Dr. Zhivago. I would just add that Julie Christie can't act, but probably comes closer to acting in this film than any other.

I'm somewhat harsher on Gone With The Wind. I think it is perhaps the most over-rated film of all time. It is Over-wrought, ludicrous, and often unintentionally funny. Okay, the burning of Atlanta looks good, for the day.

Where I have to disagree is on The Graduate. I graduated from HS in 1966, and it certainly spoke to me, and many of my friends. It was about how the "establishment" had your life all laid out for you, and was as seductive, and transitory, as Mrs. Robinson's come-on. I suggest you listen to Frank Zappa's Freak Out album to understand the double meaning of "plastics..."
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Old March 11th 09, 01:51   #660
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Re: What are you watching now?

I don't care how corny this makes me look, but where other people put Citizen Kane and Chinatown and The Godfather in their pantheons of movie greats, I put Rocky. It hits me in an emotional way like some dramas and romances hit women. Just a perfect, perfect movie, so good it excuses most of the nonsense Stallone did later on.
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