B5TV.COM. Babylon 5 forums Babylon 5 message for the fans from Claudia Christian Babylon 5
Old July 16th 17, 14:56   #31
Looney
Ambassador
 
Looney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Middle West U.S.
Posts: 221
Re: Rewatching Babylon 5.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vacantlook View Post
And The Sky Full Of Stars

While there was a bit of a reference to Sinclair’s missing time in “Soul Hunter,” this is the first real, substantive episode to handle that piece of his history. Amnesia plots can be tiresome and cliché and common, so this really needs something more than just Sinclair’s lost his memory in order to be interesting. I think Babylon 5 does well with this plot by making it be a mystery that resulted in consequences. The war ended. Sinclair’s statements both in this episode and in the revised version of “The Gathering” make clear that Earth really had no hope to win the war; the Battle of the Line was solely a purposeful sacrifice mission to buy time for as many who could escape Earth to do so. So we know that the war ending, especially as a result of the Minbari surrendering, all in a relatively short time period that Sinclair just happens to not remember gives us this huge monumental shift in the galaxy’s politics but without an explanation as to why.
Yes JMS takes another cliche plot and turns it into something. One aspect I really like is that they take the time to introduce the Security Officer. The fact that they show the two Knights had inside help makes all the difference when telling this story.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vacantlook View Post
I don’t really feel a need to see the Knights again. They, like with the later one-shot appearance of Bureau 13 (which had to be renamed for its respective production reasons) are both plots that kind of dead ended, despite their set-up suggesting something that should have brought them back into the show at some point. On rewatches, this kind of annoys me, even while I understand why things are the way they are.
And here is a detail that upset me. I agree that the Knight characters themselves really never needed to be brought back, but it would have been nice to have some explanation. Of course in this instance I think it is fine that they are not mentioned again. It just would have been a nice additional detail.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vacantlook View Post
The theme of what one did during the war also includes information about both Delenn, which we already know she was on the Grey Council, but we also learn she was specifically at the Battle of the Line. We also learn about Dr Franklin, who tells Delenn that he destroyed his notes rather than let them be used to create biological weapons. So we get this reoccurring aspect to Franklin’s character introduced here: that he’s willing to take a stand and act in defiance of orders to do something, especially if he thinks doing so will save lives.
This quality in Franklin has always been a point of debate for me. I understand what it is supposed to tell us about Franklin, but once you've seen In The Beginning I feel like it actually detracts from his character. If Earth were really facing extinction and he still wouldn't use his notes then is that really all that noble of a stance he has taken? We're talking about all of humanity. Shouldn't that have been a desperate enough situation to warrant some debate? What I mean is that showing Franklin struggle with that debate would have meant so much more. If we had seen him just before the battle of the line being tempted to reveal his secrets or something I feel like I would have this doubt about his character.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vacantlook View Post
So, the surviving Knight is shipped back home, his mind fractured from everything. The “maybe we’re both still inside” line is so expected and makes me groan. So many mental-located or virtual world stories put a line in like that, and somehow ever writer who writes such a line thinks they’re being clever, but really, they’re being cliché.
I agree, but at the same time I feel it serves a purpose - what if the rest of the series did all take place in Sinclair's mind?!?!?!?!
Looney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 16th 17, 15:02   #32
Looney
Ambassador
 
Looney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Middle West U.S.
Posts: 221
Re: Rewatching Babylon 5.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vacantlook View Post
Deathwalker

This is an episode I generally like going through again when I do rewatches. Mostly because I think the primary thing I think of when I think of this episode is the performance of the character Na'Toth. It makes me sad the actor couldn't do the role beyond this season.

Kosh does something other than get poisoned or sit? stand? float? in his quarters. He’s still super cryptic though. And he’s set his sights on Talia. Since Talia has to be written out of the show, what happens to her in this episode ends up being meaningless. I’ve seen it said that it was supposed to have something to do with Kosh rebuilding her personality after the Control personality was to be revealed and Talia’s mind subsumed by Control, but I don’t know. Whatever the plans for the data Kosh gains, it’s too odd with only what’s here to be satisfying.

Deathwalker, a Dilgar, with whom Earth once went to war. I like the visual effects make up design for the Dilgar enough that I wish we could have seen more of them. The Dilgar were apparently really nasty people, a Nazi experiments in space sort of story. I’m glad those experiments weren’t actually depicted on the show because such depictions, heck even just reading about them in historical writing, makes me utterly sick.

“Understanding is a three-edged sword.” Yay, Koshisms are one of the truly fun things this show gives us from the Vorlons.

So, the VCR, Abbot, or whatever he should be called, was apparently originally written to be played by Gilbert Gottfried. With all respect to him, I’m not a fan of his style, so I’m glad it wasn’t him. It would have been nice if the character didn’t flatten out as much as it does with the actor they did get though. Although, “Crab Nebula!” is out of the realm of obsurdist humor that it’s not all bad.

So if I understand things correctly, the Dilgar were decimated when their sun exploded. I think the idea left not fully expressed was that the Vorlons destroyed them by blowing up their sun because of having learned that the Shadows had made inroads into manipulating the Dilgar much in the way that they would manipulate the Centauri.

We get to see the League of Non-Aligned Worlds have some weight on events that occur at Babylon 5. We get to see the Abbai again, which is nice. And we get to see some odd League ships. The Drazi make their first real appearance, having only been miscellaneously in the background before now. We also get Vree ships, though lesser models than what show up later in the show in the various, shall we say, multinational fleets that fight. Too bad the Vree themselves are only used as a joke in one episode; I would rather have had the owners of such frequently seen ships belong to a species we got to see a lot more on the station. And the third of the three ships that come to B5 from the League in this episode is the Iksha, whom we never see again. Their ships were interesting; it would have been nice to see them actually in combat.

So, some Minbari are guilty of having supported Deathwalker. How interesting that after last episode wherein we learned that, much to Delenn’s approval, Franklin destroyed his research to keep it from being used to make weapons; here, we learn that the Minbari welcomed Deathwalker and her research so they could have weapons. Kind of makes Delenn look like a hypocrite, though I imagine she wasn’t not impacted by cultural expectation to help save face for the faults made by others. But still.

So Sinclair once again negotiates around the situation to try to find something that works to dissolve the tension, but the Vorlons show up to blow Deathwalker into rubble before her ship could get away. Kosh walks away with the comment, “You’re not ready for immortality,” which beyond being just a cool line, suggests that Vorlons are immortal.
I just quoted everything because I am out of time to make long comments. I love this episode because there is so much detail about the past. This episode is what makes me hope that JMS' idea for a reboot feature might revolve around the Dilgar war.
Looney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 17th 17, 20:33   #33
vacantlook
Moderator
 
vacantlook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Virginia
Posts: 11,891
Re: Rewatching Babylon 5.

Believers

This is an uncomfortable episode, which I suppose is the point. I’m the kind of person who experiences sympathetic embarrassment easily, and I go through it a lot in this episode. The expression / discussion of the alien-of-the-week’s religion feels really silly and it often takes me out of the story, unfortunately.

This episode does touch at a real-world issue: the butting of religion against science as a conflict of culture. The easiest real-world example is refusing medical treatment, like a blood transfusion, for one’s child and saying God will heal them. If my memory serves, there was a case in the past few years of religious people not getting a child’s diabetes treated for such a faith reason. We can even remove obvious religion from the equation and still see the problem, for example within the anti-vaccination movement. Or in the opposite direction of forcing something some try to label as therapy on a child that has no scientifically proven validity: like conversion therapy used on LGBT youth.

“I’ll just walk to and fro for a while. Maybe over to my console. Maybe after that I can try pacing fro and to, just for the kick of it.” Sarcastic Ivanova is a joy. I don’t really see what her B-plot in this episode really does though. I guess the idea was that it would provide some action scenes since so much of the episode is philosophical discussion. It keeps the existence of the raiders present in the story arc. But really, that part of this episode doesn’t really add anything important. It’s just kind of miscellaneously there.

This episode, obviously, puts a lot of focus on Franklin, and once again we get to experience his willingness to defy orders to try to help people. Unfortunately, it doesn’t matter since the parents reject and eventually murder their child. It’s a painful ending, but feels realistic. Maybe it’s because of my own personal turmoil with religious-based rejection, but this episode ends up too uncomfortable for me, so I’m not a fan of rewatching it much, even if I think it has powerful plot turns.

We do get another great Koshism: “The avalanche has already started; it is too late for the pebbles to vote.”
vacantlook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 17th 17, 20:33   #34
vacantlook
Moderator
 
vacantlook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Virginia
Posts: 11,891
Re: Rewatching Babylon 5.

Survivors

We start by seeing Garibaldi and Ivanova entering the core shuttle. While we’ve had characters on the shuttle before, this is the first time (unless I’m mistaken) that we’ve seen people getting on / getting off the shuttle. And their doing so brings us into the plot: sabotage in advance of the arrival of the Earth Alliance President.

This episode focuses on Garibaldi. I now a lot of people love Garibaldi as a character; to me, he’s okay, but he’s expected. There’s not really anything about him that feels particularly new to me. But he is an example of how common human problems will not go away just because we become a space-faring species. Garibaldi is an alcoholic. It’s a sensitive subject for me, given my family history.

We get a person from a character’s past coming to the station; thankfully, they’re not a former lover, for a change. She’s angry at Garibaldi, and he falls apart. I can’t help not being all that interested in their relationship. Major Kemmer comes in and stomps around. She tries to revive the injured man to get a name from him, and of course the expected answer is Garibaldi. “Why would a dying man lie,” she asks. He’s a man who is in an altered mental state, having just been chemically dragged out of a coma. His word is hardly reliable. That it’s treated as it is annoys me.

Then there’s Cutter, the guy who works under Kemmer. He is not performed with any subtlety whatsoever. Surprise, he’s the villain; except no surprise whatsoever, really.

“You are going to resist, I hope,” Ivanova says to Kemmer when Sinclair orders her off the command deck. It’s moments like these that makes me love Ivanova. “I’m a lieutenant commander in Earthforce, I do not take demands.”

The scene with Londo is nicely revealing about his character too. “I have been in your place. I can feel how you’re pinned,” he tells Garibaldi. Knowing what’s coming, this of course is foreshadowing what Londo will do and how it will impact him. The suspicion and antagonism between Londo and G’Kar isn’t as spotlighted in this episode, but it is there. “They won’t give you death, they’ll just take everything you value and leave you with nothing,” G’Kar tells Garibaldi, also foreshadowing some of his coming experience in the show. I don’t remember having paid as much attention to Londo’s and G’Kar’s parts in this episode before.

What kind of security does Babylon 5 have? Garibaldi leaves n’grath’s quarters, a guard comes around the corner, Garibaldi goes in the other direction, and the guard takes out his ppg and fires at Garibaldi. What law enforcement is that? Oh, look, there’s a person that because of the plot we know is Garibaldi, shoot him?? I mean, there’s little way to identify that it’s Garibaldi; he’s got a breather mask on, as does the guard, so not only is Garibaldi’s face obscured, so too is the guard’s vision. But then, we have a culture here in America now that law enforcement too quickly turn to shooting someone rather than trying to deescalate the situation, so I guess it shouldn’t be too surprising. But if that was where it came from in the story, maybe that’d be okay, but it’s not; the guard shoots at him because the plot says Garibaldi needs to be shot at. Not the smoothest writing, for sure.

It’s nice seeing the conspiracy plot arc is still brewing beneath the surface of the story, even if the acting and specifics are clunky. Some anti-alien “pro-Earth” group is trying to undermine President Santiago, who has a more alien-accepting policy position. As ungraceful as much of this episode’s characterization, dialog, and acting is, the anti-alien conspiracy plot is more involved and interesting than the previous one back in “The War Prayer.”

“Holding at T-minus 1,” really writer? Really? Ivanova’s hesitancy to follow through on Garibaldi’s warning is as unrealistic as the clichéd at-the-last-second stopping of the timer.

“Make sure nothing happens to [the President]; we need all the friends we can get,” Garibaldi says. Once again, this episode gives us foreshowing of the coming plot.
vacantlook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 17th 17, 20:34   #35
vacantlook
Moderator
 
vacantlook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Virginia
Posts: 11,891
Re: Rewatching Babylon 5.

By Any Means Necessary

Hooray, another episode with guest actors that chew the scenery. That aside, I like that we get a sort of boring life episode. How does all the real life needs of the station go on when the bigger story arcs are taking place? Well, here’s a look into that. We also get to see the realistic situation of labor, which is necessary for our way of life, being so easily disrespected, like common workers are easily forgotten. We eventually see that too in Minbari culture; Delenn even calls everyone out on it in an episode much further down the line, if I remember correctly: “You forgot about them, didn’t you,” she tells the Grey Council (I am remembering that right, it’s like 4th season??).

The real life history of the fight for workers’ rights is a very tense and deadly story. No surprise that this episode seeks to fictionally tell that ongoing story in the future. Once again, Babylon 5 shows that the same problems humans have had and have now will not be solved by our future. Human nature and desire to exploit others is too deep for that. The negotiator keeps threatening the Rush Act (seriously, the number of times the words “Rush Act” are spoken in this episode is excessive); if I understand it correctly, the strikers would be arrested and replacement workers would be brought in. How in the world would that not be more expensive than just paying the existing staff more? Not that power usually really cares about budgetary/monetary/financial conservatism when the guttural thrill of using power to abuse those less powerful is an option.

The solution comes to Sinclair through a lot of luck and a bit of publicly manifestations of his subtle manipulation of the individual that was sent to B5 to stomp on the workers. As much as the show does put Sinclair in positions to punch villains, this story shows us Sinclair also operates with a canny mind.

Also, Garibaldi’s eventually “second in command,” or whatever his official position is, is alongside Garibaldi in the riot scene. He doesn’t speak any, but is this is first episode?

This episode gives us something we did not get in “The Parliament of Dreams”: Narn religion. And unlike in the alien religion in “Believers,” G’Kar’s religious practice is not awkward or embarrassing. Londo takes the opportunity to specifically taunt and antagonize G’Kar, and he specifically sites his doing so as revenge for what the Narn did to his nephew in “Midnight On The Firing Line.” So as much as Londo is a dick about it all, I simultaneously can’t blame him too much. Seeing G’Kar’s genuine expression of his faith gives us a new layer to his character. In the same way that his interactions with Catherine Sakai deepens his character, so too does this. Sinclair’s solution for the timing of G’Kar’s ceremony is reliant upon the reality of physics of light. Yay science!!
vacantlook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th 17, 17:00   #36
Wulf
Ranger
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 80
Re: Rewatching Babylon 5.

I don't have much to comment on, but I'm enjoying reading your thoughts on each episode.

It reminds me why whenever I try to get around to a rewatch lately I don't make it through Season 1. I used to just blame it on Sinclair since he's the easy target, but no. The show really stumbled a fair bit in season 1 before it found its footing.

Don't get me wrong, I love the show and what it become, but "sympathetic embarrassment" is a good phrase to have handy.
Wulf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th 17, 21:20   #37
Looney
Ambassador
 
Looney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Middle West U.S.
Posts: 221
Re: Rewatching Babylon 5.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vacantlook View Post
Believers

This is an uncomfortable episode, which I suppose is the point. I’m the kind of person who experiences sympathetic embarrassment easily, and I go through it a lot in this episode. The expression / discussion of the alien-of-the-week’s religion feels really silly and it often takes me out of the story, unfortunately.

This episode does touch at a real-world issue: the butting of religion against science as a conflict of culture. The easiest real-world example is refusing medical treatment, like a blood transfusion, for one’s child and saying God will heal them. If my memory serves, there was a case in the past few years of religious people not getting a child’s diabetes treated for such a faith reason. We can even remove obvious religion from the equation and still see the problem, for example within the anti-vaccination movement. Or in the opposite direction of forcing something some try to label as therapy on a child that has no scientifically proven validity: like conversion therapy used on LGBT youth.

“I’ll just walk to and fro for a while. Maybe over to my console. Maybe after that I can try pacing fro and to, just for the kick of it.” Sarcastic Ivanova is a joy. I don’t really see what her B-plot in this episode really does though. I guess the idea was that it would provide some action scenes since so much of the episode is philosophical discussion. It keeps the existence of the raiders present in the story arc. But really, that part of this episode doesn’t really add anything important. It’s just kind of miscellaneously there.

This episode, obviously, puts a lot of focus on Franklin, and once again we get to experience his willingness to defy orders to try to help people. Unfortunately, it doesn’t matter since the parents reject and eventually murder their child. It’s a painful ending, but feels realistic. Maybe it’s because of my own personal turmoil with religious-based rejection, but this episode ends up too uncomfortable for me, so I’m not a fan of rewatching it much, even if I think it has powerful plot turns.

We do get another great Koshism: “The avalanche has already started; it is too late for the pebbles to vote.”
I think this is one of the most powerful episodes and I find it very uncomfortable to watch. I think one of the best moments is when Franklin is gloating and wants an apology. There is so much realism in that moment it hurts.

And as far as Ivanova's "B" story goes I think it serves a two-fold purpose. One it establishes that she is indeed a competent pilot and two it gives her character a be careful what you wish for tale.
Looney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th 17, 22:00   #38
Looney
Ambassador
 
Looney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Middle West U.S.
Posts: 221
Re: Rewatching Babylon 5.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vacantlook View Post

This episode focuses on Garibaldi. I now a lot of people love Garibaldi as a character; to me, he’s okay, but he’s expected. There’s not really anything about him that feels particularly new to me. But he is an example of how common human problems will not go away just because we become a space-faring species. Garibaldi is an alcoholic. It’s a sensitive subject for me, given my family history.
Yeah I am not a huge Garibaldi fan, but Doyle did make him serve so many purposes very well. He plays the 'Everyman' - rich man, poor man, troubled man, smart man, foolish man, funny man, manipulated man, hungry man, violent man, peaceful man, wise man, hero and villain. I don't think Doyle's acting talent is quite on par with some of the other players, but he does a great job at doing so many jobs. He doesn't always do them perfectly, but he pulls it off in some manner.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vacantlook View Post
“You are going to resist, I hope,” Ivanova says to Kemmer when Sinclair orders her off the command deck. It’s moments like these that makes me love Ivanova. “I’m a lieutenant commander in Earthforce, I do not take demands.”
Yes this is one of those moments that really works for Ivanova. I have to admit there are moments where it is forced and doesn't work as well, but here it is well placed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vacantlook View Post
The scene with Londo is nicely revealing about his character too. “I have been in your place. I can feel how you’re pinned,” he tells Garibaldi. Knowing what’s coming, this of course is foreshadowing what Londo will do and how it will impact him. The suspicion and antagonism between Londo and G’Kar isn’t as spotlighted in this episode, but it is there. “They won’t give you death, they’ll just take everything you value and leave you with nothing,” G’Kar tells Garibaldi, also foreshadowing some of his coming experience in the show. I don’t remember having paid as much attention to Londo’s and G’Kar’s parts in this episode before.
I often feel that JMS wrote Londo and G'Kar and then wrote the series around them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vacantlook View Post
What kind of security does Babylon 5 have? Garibaldi leaves n’grath’s quarters, a guard comes around the corner, Garibaldi goes in the other direction, and the guard takes out his ppg and fires at Garibaldi. What law enforcement is that? Oh, look, there’s a person that because of the plot we know is Garibaldi, shoot him?? I mean, there’s little way to identify that it’s Garibaldi; he’s got a breather mask on, as does the guard, so not only is Garibaldi’s face obscured, so too is the guard’s vision. But then, we have a culture here in America now that law enforcement too quickly turn to shooting someone rather than trying to deescalate the situation, so I guess it shouldn’t be too surprising. But if that was where it came from in the story, maybe that’d be okay, but it’s not; the guard shoots at him because the plot says Garibaldi needs to be shot at. Not the smoothest writing, for sure.
In the past I felt this way and then I realized, throwing the identification obstruction aside, Cutter isn't acting alone. [SEE QUOTE BELOW.]

Quote:
Originally Posted by vacantlook View Post
It’s nice seeing the conspiracy plot arc is still brewing beneath the surface of the story, even if the acting and specifics are clunky. Some anti-alien “pro-Earth” group is trying to undermine President Santiago, who has a more alien-accepting policy position. As ungraceful as much of this episode’s characterization, dialog, and acting is, the anti-alien conspiracy plot is more involved and interesting than the previous one back in “The War Prayer.”
See the conspiracy plot is brewing and there is a "group" of conspirators, so that may have been why Garibaldi was shot at. Of course I am reading between the lines, but B5 is even more interesting if you can read between the lines and come up with a logical explanation that makes sense. Maybe JMS didn't intend for us to think the person who fired the PPG at Garbaldi was in on the conspiracy or maybe he did.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vacantlook View Post
“Make sure nothing happens to [the President]; we need all the friends we can get,” Garibaldi says. Once again, this episode gives us foreshowing of the coming plot.
Yep. Had I seen all of Season One when it originally aired I would have known at that moment Santiago was going to get it.
Looney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 18th 17, 22:08   #39
Looney
Ambassador
 
Looney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Middle West U.S.
Posts: 221
Re: Rewatching Babylon 5.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vacantlook View Post
By Any Means Necessary

Hooray, another episode with guest actors that chew the scenery. That aside, I like that we get a sort of boring life episode. How does all the real life needs of the station go on when the bigger story arcs are taking place? Well, here’s a look into that. We also get to see the realistic situation of labor, which is necessary for our way of life, being so easily disrespected, like common workers are easily forgotten. We eventually see that too in Minbari culture; Delenn even calls everyone out on it in an episode much further down the line, if I remember correctly: “You forgot about them, didn’t you,” she tells the Grey Council (I am remembering that right, it’s like 4th season??).

The real life history of the fight for workers’ rights is a very tense and deadly story. No surprise that this episode seeks to fictionally tell that ongoing story in the future. Once again, Babylon 5 shows that the same problems humans have had and have now will not be solved by our future. Human nature and desire to exploit others is too deep for that. The negotiator keeps threatening the Rush Act (seriously, the number of times the words “Rush Act” are spoken in this episode is excessive); if I understand it correctly, the strikers would be arrested and replacement workers would be brought in. How in the world would that not be more expensive than just paying the existing staff more? Not that power usually really cares about budgetary/monetary/financial conservatism when the guttural thrill of using power to abuse those less powerful is an option.

The solution comes to Sinclair through a lot of luck and a bit of publicly manifestations of his subtle manipulation of the individual that was sent to B5 to stomp on the workers. As much as the show does put Sinclair in positions to punch villains, this story shows us Sinclair also operates with a canny mind.
Yes I think this is a brilliant episode in that it gives us this detailed story of life on the station. I wish there were more stories like this. I always wanted more details about station life and different places and characters on the station. Plus it brings in that realism of the struggle for workers' rights vs greed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vacantlook View Post
This episode gives us something we did not get in “The Parliament of Dreams”: Narn religion. And unlike in the alien religion in “Believers,” G’Kar’s religious practice is not awkward or embarrassing. Londo takes the opportunity to specifically taunt and antagonize G’Kar, and he specifically sites his doing so as revenge for what the Narn did to his nephew in “Midnight On The Firing Line.” So as much as Londo is a dick about it all, I simultaneously can’t blame him too much. Seeing G’Kar’s genuine expression of his faith gives us a new layer to his character. In the same way that his interactions with Catherine Sakai deepens his character, so too does this. Sinclair’s solution for the timing of G’Kar’s ceremony is reliant upon the reality of physics of light. Yay science!!
One of the best "B" plot lines in the series that I guess is actually an "A" plot line because it feeds the overall arc a little more than the workers' strike story does.
Looney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 30th 17, 15:36   #40
Looney
Ambassador
 
Looney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Middle West U.S.
Posts: 221
Re: Rewatching Babylon 5.

I thought I would expand more on what I said about life on the station after discussing By Any Means Necessary got my mind working.

I think it would be wonderful to have expanded universe tales about things we didn't see that don't even have to pertain to any great extent to main characters. We know there are 250,000 people on B5 at any given time. They all have stories and needs. They all have to eat somewhere, sleep somewhere, and have some reason or purpose. Those are all a fountain of stories we could hear.

We know there are a variety of stores, restaurants, clubs, and bars on B5, but why not hotels? Can anyone tell me one instance where a hotel name was mentioned? I know there are episodes that discuss accommodations for travelers, but I only remember ever hearing it referred to as guest quarters in certain sections. Why not hotel names? And if there are hotels how would they work? Would they just be demarcated guest quarters in a certain sections?

We also know from effects shots of the central core there are parts of the station that expand into the central core that look like buildings. What are they all? We know the Military Governor of Babylon 5 has an office in one of the buildings because we've seen the evidence. Are the other buildings hotels? Are they just quarters for people like Ambassadors to have windows? Are they corporate headquarters?

That last question brings me to another point, couldn't we have had more interaction with corporations that did have permanent offices on B5? There obviously were companies that did. Which leads to this question, why doesn't Psi Corps have offices on B5? Vacantlook brought up the notion that it seems odd that Talia is the only Telepath on B5. I agree and I want to know does she actually have an office? I guess she could and I think there is an episode where she does mention something like contact my office. We never see her there, but it is possible. But as was discussed, why aren't there more Telepaths around? We know they come and go from the station, but I mean permanent residents with certain duties. I guess we are supposed to assume that someone at Psi Corps Central thought B5 was so insignificant and temporary that they didn't need a presence on B5 and when they finally came to some realization it was too late and they could do nothing about it. Of course, after Mind War Bester would have had to suggest they put a permanent office staffed with Telepaths on B5.

Okay I would love to expand on more, but I've got to go.

Last edited by Looney; July 30th 17 at 15:39.
Looney is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 07:44.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
©2001 - 2008 B5TV.COM