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Old January 27th 14, 10:05   #2
Springer
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Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 391
Re: The Archeology of Dreams

Your upbringing sounds remarkably like JMS'. When he writes about it he says that with all the moving around, his home was the library and the books it contained, which were the same no matter what town he went to. He also recently posted about having a lack of continuity between people during the different stages of his life.

I didn't move around at all as a child, and probably was happier in childhood that in adulthood. But now when I go back I find that everything has gone, or changed. My first two schools, demolished. My last school virtually rebuilt and I find barely anything to recognise there. The halls of residence that I stayed in for three years at university, pulled down. Even my old house where I spent the first 22 years of my life no longer looks like it used to. People I knew have moved away, I've lost touch with friends, I have myself moved away and home is no longer the place it was 20 years ago. But I find myself wanting to revisit my childhood, and staying fascinated with B5 is a part of that. B5 has ended, but it is still there with me and always will be. As a teenager it helped shape my world view. To be honest, I was quite content with the 5-year story ending. I'm not sure I would want a continuation or a reboot anymore because its essence would't be the show I grew up with. It would be something else.

One of the things B5 always taught was that nothing stays the same – things change, that is the natural order of life. I celebrate what B5 was and what it means to me now and meant to me as a teenager growing up and watching it, attending the conventions and buying the merchandise. B5 is of its time and it is a time that I am fond to remember and grow nostalgic about, but sadly a time that I know I can never truly recapture. So if you can't go back to the past, then look to the future. I think the best way to approach the past is to honour it by building the future that we want and that we deserve, as B5 used to teach us.
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